Tag Archives: Java

Sambal

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Chopped ingredients

Sambal is a Southeast Asian condiment, a sauce, an appetizer, or an accompaniment to rice or viands. And because it’s hot and spicy, it’s something I have dearly adopted. I have learned to prepare sambal in Yogyakarta through Made, a Balinese cook.

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Shrimp paste

There are several variations of sambal, and one can modify the proportions of certain ingredient to suit one’s taste. In a nutshell, here’s the process: chop shallots, garlic, chili peppers, and tomatoes, you may crush all together with a squeeze of calamansi juice, then saute everything with belacan (shrimp paste) in a small amount of oil. You’re done if you feel the urge to sneeze.

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Not the saucy version as I didn’t crush the ingredients. Perfect accompaniment to my weekend lunch of fried eggplant and fried fish

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Here’s Made, the Balinese cook

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Made’s recipes in our cooking class can be found inside this Javanese cookbook

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Here’s Made again

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Front cover of the cookbook. A souvenir from my Jogja trip

Womenfolk Knapsack

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Lady carrying a sack of goods in an alley in Jogja

Sounding Bamboo

An array of sound producing bamboo implements as traditional entertainment or toys of Java children.

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Flute, bird whistle, top (will make sound when spun) and the unidentified one as seen in Malioboro street, Yogyakarta

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Doing bird whistling by blowing and moving the stick at the same time

Tricolor Rice Eats

Rub-a-dub-dub, three sticky rice thing in a tub.
And what do you think they were?

This lady vendor in Prambanan Temple Compound has three appealing variations of sticky rice snack where the texture and taste are similar to a couple of glutinous rice based kakanin in the Philippines.
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The purple one taste like puto maya while the pink one looks like an odd-shaped mochi with no filling (I was too full of the purple and green stuff to try this one, and its color isn’t natural that’s why).
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The green thing that’s more visible in the photo below taste like suman sa lihiya but presented in tiny square bite size.

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Sticks as utensil and banana leaf as plate

Whichever color you’d choose, they’ll be served with that latik at the center of the tub (sugar-coconut syrup), and garnished with grated coconut meat.

Tempe

Very common in Javanese diet is this fermented whole soybeans known as tempe (or tempeh).

The lady at the market was showing the whole soybeans in banana leaf ready to be fermented inside those sacks in the floor.
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Fermentation process ongoing in those sacks. After 24 hours one can already enjoy the protein rich tempe.
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Newly fermented tempe on the table. Still warm when we bought it.
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Slicing tempe in thin strips and frying it till crispy then covering it in caramel sauce using palm sugar will make a perfect accompaniment to spicy dishes.
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