Tag Archives: Cambulo

Village Snapshots: Cambulo

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After about 1.5 hours of trekking from Batad village, the destination village of Cambulo is now visible from this spot. See those white specks in the slopes? That's the destination on foot.

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Traditional Ifugao shelters in Cambulo village

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Another Ifugao wooden house with thatched roof

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Foot bridge within the village

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A closer look of the foot bridge

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Ifugao child sitting on the doorstep of his traditional house

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Galvanized iron roof instead of thatched roof. Most houses have evolved

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Modern shelters made from hollow blocks with galvanized iron roof

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A Philippine playground is never complete without a basketball court, even in a mountain school

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Students trooping back inside the classrooms after recess

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Christian assimilation of the village

Curtain from Chips Bag

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Ceiling ornamentation and curtains made from food foil bags or foil wrappers

Food wrappers or bags repurposed into ceiling ornamentation and curtains, as seen in a guesthouse in Cambulo, a village that is accessible by foot only. Processed food stuff (like chips or Choco Mucho) which are packaged in foil, have already reached the mountain villages in Ifugao. They’ve probably sourced it in Banaue town center.

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Closer look of the curtain

Those non-biodegradable wrappers can accumulate and litter the verdant mountains and rice terraces. It’s a wise thing they’ve repurposed these into something practical or decorative.

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Cambulo Guesthouse

In Batad village and Banaue town center I’ve also observed food bags or wrappers being repurposed into sellable products like wallets and pouches.

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Wallets or coin purse

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Sewing wallets while managing a tiny store of cold beverages and processed snacks (for hikers) at this shack in Batad rice terraces

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Repurposing paraphernalia

Mountain Paddies

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Today’s proof of the past

With no machineries but rudimentary tools, the ancestors of Ifugaos today have manually carved the slopes of the mountains into rice paddy terraces. Where there is water source, the natives can build terraces even if the slopes are rocky. The most important thing is the water source and of course, the incredible collective efforts of the Ifugaos.

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Structures seen on the slopes of Batad village. The Ifugao rice farming methods haven’t changed much, but the houses have evolved

There are many articles out there about the history, the way of life, and rituals of the Ifugaos and their rice terraces. What I have here are few snapshots of the cultural landscape of the past that is preserved until today, as I trek from Batad village to Cambulo village and back.

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Light rain at the start of the trek but thankfully the skies cleared. Trekking in downpour can be precarious in the narrow paddy dikes

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Heirloom rice crop

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The view of the Batad rice terraces as I sat at the topmost paddy dike

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Verdant look before harvest time

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Walking in single file for it’s a steep drop at the other side

Banaue’s Folk Typography

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They serve purple rice (or black rice mixed with white) and their staple viand is pata with monggo

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Students made paper flags and stuck them in plant pots for the Philippine Independence Day last June 12

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I like their squash pandesal

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Had lunch in here after 3 hour hike from Batad, and to sustain another 3 hour trek back to Batad

Chicken Coop Basket

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In Ifugao villages, one can notice this dome shaped basket with wooden floor and wooden door used for transporting and caging chickens.

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Every morning, they would let the chickens go to freely roam, then gather them once more in the cage before dusk.

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