Category Archives: Pinoy Way of Life

Copra

A specialized tool is used to to manually separate the copra from its shell. The meat will then be dried before extracting the coconut oil. How about the shell? It will be made into charcoal known as ‘uling bagol’.

A thick spatula-like tool is inserted between the meat and the shell.

Once inserted, the tool should be moved in a circular manner to separate the meat inch by inch.

Social Distancing

Signs on the wall:

“Palihog dili tanggalon ang hikot sa banko”
“social distancing”

Monobloc chairs tied to the table — new normal way of preventing the old normal way of getting chairs from other tables for group dining.

Sea Wall Massage Area

Man putting down a triangular prism sign that says “Massage Therapy”. Massage on the sea wall starts at sundown.

Tanod Box

A barangay police box in Mandaluyong

The lowest level of political unit in the country is the barangay (similar to a village), hence the lowest level of law enforcement is the barangay tanod or simply tanod or barangay police.

Another barangay police box seen in Mandaluyong

Friday Snapshots: Jeepney Decals

Dick D’Pilot of F-16

Estados Unidos Ilocos Express

Community Weighing Scale 

Timbangan ng Bayan

Providing common weighing scales (Timbangan ng Bayan) inside public markets is an example of a Philippine government public service. Now folks have a way to double check the weight of the produce.
Sort of a vendor rip-off deterrence tool.

Sunday Snapshots: Laundry Time

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Washing clothes in the river

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A communal spot in the river for washing clothes

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This communal spot has makeshift sun shield roof

Celebratory Chevon

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Last Sunday I hiked through the rainforest of Makiling. Along the trail, I made use of an outhouse toilet at the back of a shack that sells coconuts to hikers. While waiting for my turn, I saw a slaughtered goat waiting to be immersed in a scalding water for dehairing. Then I heard people talking indoors and I’ve come to understand that the kambing is for somebody’s birthday.

Drying Goods on the Road

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Karagumoy hats

In the probinsya, public roads are not only for vehicles and pedestrians but as readily available space for sun drying food and non-food stuff. More frequently observed is grain drying, especially rice grains, and sometimes corn. Then there’s also coconut drying (copra). But it’s only in Bicol region where I saw gabi leaves drying and karagumoy hats drying.

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Gabi leaves for laing?

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Copra

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Rice grains

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Highway Sampayan

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Clothes are hanged to dry on makeshift sampayan (clothesline), or on a rope tied between road signs, and even on the highway bridge railings. We know that one cannot have an immaculate newly laundered shirts with all the highway dust and exhaust, but it seems the only goal is to have dry and sun sterilized clothes.

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Road signs as poles for the clothesline

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Bridge railing covered with newly laundered clothes

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Jeepney Spare Tyre

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Jeepney drivers must be acrobatically inclined. Apart from the ability to drive defensively in one hand while the other hand is collecting fare, a jeepney driver can apparently go in and out with ease. One could see that the driver’s door is significantly blocked by a spare tyre. And yes, that’s the standard location for the spare.

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Driving tip: Distancia amigo, your side mirror will never be up against that spare tyre.

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Everybody’s Inside

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It was a fine cloudy Saturday morning around 7 o’clock, perfect for running, walking, biking or playing. It was a fine morning to be outside. But where is every Juan, Maria and Pedro? When they finally wake up, most will go outside to get inside those air-conditioned towns known as “malls.”

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D’Airplane

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From what has been passed on to me, the brand name came to be because long time ago their pots and pans were really crafted from aircraft aluminum scrap. D’ Airplane is an old low-cost aluminum cookware brand that’s very common in the country and still being sold in department stores.

Baywalk

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I took this picture of Manila Baywalk on June 2008

In an archipelago nation like ours where most provincial capitals are not landlocked, the existence of “baywalk“ is common in towns and cities in modern day Philippines. Baywalk functions as park for public use. Perhaps the term “baywalk” was adopted throughout the country because of the Roxas Boulevard Baywalk in Manila, the most notable of them all.

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Puerto Princesa Baywalk

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Another view of Puerto Princesa Baywalk

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Baywalk in Zamboanga City

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Baywalk sunset in Zamboanga City

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Baywalk in Dumaguete City

 

Bus Window Peddlers

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At the rest stops for bus journeys in Cebu province, peddlers will hawk refreshments, mostly local delicacies and travel food staples such as boiled eggs, boiled peanuts, or boiled corn in the bus open windows — that is if you’re on a window seat in a non-aircon bus. The advantages of riding non-aircon bus apart from paying less are the natural breeze, bukid scents, unobstructed view for sightseeing or capturing photos, and convenient window buying of snacks.

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Vendors resting while waiting for the next bus

 

EDSA John

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Makeshift pay urinal along EDSA near Malibay

People resort to inventing ‘work’ no matter how unnecessary their services may be just to survive in the city. You may see those folks calling out for passengers to ride the jeepney and they’ll receive few coins as fee from jeepney drivers. I’m sure some drivers find this unnecessary but they readily pay. They can relate, and so they recognize the effort of others trying to earn few pesos. You may also see those folks guiding drivers out from roadside parking, or those folks hailing taxis for other people hoping for tips. Some folks can be cunning where they capitalize on flash floods by providing makeshift raft for pedestrians who don’t want to walk on dirty water. Somebody also thought of capitalizing the lack of public toilets along EDSA by setting up makeshift pay urinal made from repurposed water container, and using scrap hose as drain to the sewer which has been secured to the ground by scrap wood.

Queue Chairs

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Sitting queue at the COMELEC (Commission on Elections) voters registration in this precinct

Rows of chair are sometimes provided in queues for relief and comfort. The sequence is usually row by row (not column by column).  Specifically, row 1:column 1, then row 1:column 2, then row 1 column 3row 2:column 1, row 2:column 2, row 2:column 3… and so on.

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From the queue chair's point of view

This sitting queue method is quite common in the country. Either butts synchronously slide to the next chair for the line to move, or if the next chair is a bit far that sliding becomes precarious, you’ll see people stand up, step sideways, then sit down (repeat n times).

Terminal 1 Rolling Store

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Rolling store - only in Terminal 1

Hungry or thirsty while waiting by the check-in counters at NAIA Terminal 1? No problem. There are several rolling stores at your service.

Generic Fiesta Ornamentation

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Banderitas in El Nido town for the upcoming Balinsasayaw Festival this March

The most visible generic sign of an approaching town fiesta is no other than the banderitas. These precursory colorful flying triangles effectively set the mood of the townsfolk for the festivities.

Traveling Beach Salesmen

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Sunglasses for sale are displayed on a wooden panel and carried around by vendors. Notably I haven’t seen at least one successful sale transaction so far.

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