Category Archives: Seafood

Toadstool-shaped Lato

The toadstool-shaped lato (seaweed) in Cateel tastes even better than the grape-like lato.
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Egg Mass of Wedge Seahare

Egg mass (lukot) from wedge seahare (Dolabella auricularia). This is normally eaten raw and always a delightful treat. It is high in mineral and amino acids, an ideal food for human consumption.

Lukot is also used like a vegetable component of tinolang isda (clear fish soup). A glassful of it cost PHP 50 at Agdao Market.

Nucos

Seafood at Agdao Market

Mussels, clams, guso, etc.

Tuna carving

Milkfish

Round scad (galunggong)

Espada arrangement

Barilis Stall

Well-lighted tuna stall, with installed miniature altar for Santo Niño.

Wasay-wasay

Wasay-wasay in its uncooked state

Charcoal-grilled wasay-wasay. Tastes even better than oysters.

Ginamos

Tubs of fermented fish at Bankerohan Market

Empty Seashells

The orderly arrangement of empty discarded seashells

New Year’s Shopping

Koreans shopping for seafood at Jalgachi Market today

Noryangjin Fish Market

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This one is an exclusively seafood market. A big one. No such sort exist in the Philippines where seafood here are sold in a specific section of the palengke, or at some corner of the talipapa. So at Noryangjin Fish Market with all its assortment of marine edibles where two-thirds of those I cannot identify, it was a wonderment to be inside, ogling unhurriedly at each edible curiosity, and hearing the din from the collective voices of the fishmongers. Obviously, they can tell that I was just an observer and not a potential customer, but I felt at ease because the ajummas and ajeossis don’t seem to mind, and they seem to understand that it was just a field trip of sort to me.

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Guso Stalls

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Guso stall at Iligan Public Market

To my fellow guso-salad lover folks, here are snapshots of guso stalls sighted at the mercado of Iligan, Ozamiz, and Oroquieta.

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Guso stall at Ozamiz Public Market

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Guso stall at Oroquieta Sunday Market (Taboan)

Saturday Snapshots: Bicycle Seafood Vendor

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Bicycle seafood vendor with umbrella doing his daily rounds

Mr. Fish Vendor would make rounds in the village daily. He will always have three choices of fresh seafood on his cargo bicycle. There’s always shrimp, while the two other tubs would contain fish and other kinds of seafood. His favorite color must be red as he always don red shirt and his three tubs are all in red color.

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Three choices of seafood and what's available today are shrimps as usual, squid, and Hasa Hasa fish

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His improvised cargo bike has improvised bicycle seat cover as well

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Egghead Octopus Snack

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Cute like an alien infant

To retain the figure of the marinated boiled baby octopus, someone thought of filling its head with boiled quail egg. Or perhaps, the idea is how to eat whole quail eggs in an innovative way – by using octopus head as edible packaging. Whatever it is, the outcome is an appealing, appetizing and filling snack. I shall never forget how I stood near the skewered stuffed octopus table at Nishiki food market as I chewed the egghead in wonderment.

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One way of eating quail eggs is to stuff it in the head of a baby octopus

Ikura at Nishiki Market

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Salmon roe locally known as ikura are those orange spheres and usually sold like this – without its sac. Tastes quite similar to lato in the Philippines with its burst of subtle saltiness that initially I thought it’s a kind of seaweed.

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Nishiki market where I took snapshot of the ikura. Pretty crowded as this was New Year’s rush

Tilapia at Talipapa

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In Manila, one can get fresh tilapia at talipapa or palengke everyday.

Fish Occupation

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All in a day’s work at Malapascua island

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Queueing at fish inspection office in Dumaguete public market

Caballas

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Dusking in the Philippines triggers the setup of grilling stand for selling hot-off-the-grill skewered viands.  We see pork or chicken barbeque in those ihaw-ihaw/sinugba stands that materialize every night in Luzon, Visayas, and Mindanao – generally.  But those typical Filipino barbeques are not widespread in Zamboanga City. What’s typical in Zambo for evening repast are these grilled caballas.

Bulad

Bulad (dried salted fish) of superior quality is plentiful in Zamboanga City public market. Fried bulad with warm rice as accompaniment is best eaten mano mano (hand as utensil). Moreover, think of bulad as fish bacon.

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Lapu lapu

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Dried squid and isda sa bato (that green one)

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Danggit

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Señor Pagi Vendor

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This señor is selling dried pagi (stingray) at Zamboanga City public market

Upon seeing me taking snapshots of his rays, he funnily posed. This señor and the rest of them palengke folks love to have their photographs taken. This is what I’ve observed with palengke vendors anyplace, and so I oblige each time, and they were giggly happy afterwards. I never tried to ask a vendor to pose for me, they just do it, and they’ve consistently amused me.

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Señor's stock of dried pagi in the bamboo basket

More often than not, this sort of welcoming atmosphere gives me a chance for some cordial exchange in bisaya dialect. That’s how I usually acquire firsthand local knowledge of their trade.

Buriring Season

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The defense mechanism of buriring is to inflate but the container is too small for everyone to puff up

When I was in Malapascua Island at the end of July until early days of August, I came upon residents gathering buriring (pufferfish) just near the shore of the beach. This small edible species is being fished for local consumption.

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Her dinner probably

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A tub for the catch

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A closer look of buriring in its normal size

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Keeping it alive, keeping it fresh

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Buriring fishing instead of playing or schooling

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Packing-up time for mission was accomplished - dinner procurement

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A shopping bag-full of catch

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Bloated yet truly cute

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