Tag Archives: toilet

Coffee Shop Toilet Door Sign

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Toilet Building

 That ritzy structure over there is just a toilet.

Toilet Gender Segregation

Mount Fuji Toilet Signs

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The phone can wait

A toilet in the mountain is like a bottomless hole, that deep I presume. What goes in is impossible to retrieve. You’ve been warned by means of a sign. Almost all toilets have no sink in order to conserve water. One needs to use the hand sanitizer (if provided by your hut) instead. No faucet showering, and no tooth brushing, even if you’ve booked a hut. Awareness have been made possible through these toilets signs, including their hope that you’ll safely climb Mount Fuji.

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Conserve water in the mountain

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Have a safe climb, says the toilet

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Unexpected freebie since everything is costly up there

2-Step Toilet Flusher

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Floor toilet with 2-step flusher

Taiwan is particular in saving water as one can observe from most of their sink faucets where the flow is powerful spray instead of steady stream, which means less water is needed in effectively removing soap from hands in just a short time. They also have this 2-step flusher so unlike the usual two buttons we normally see in Western toilets. This one in Taiwan is more hygeinic as I don’t need to use my hand. As you can see from the instructions below, one flusher is for urine, and another one dedicated for stool.

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Instruction and trivia inside the toilet. Now you know if frogs do poop

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Another toilet with 2-step flusher

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Really nice to do one’s business on the floor toilet while looking at that cat picture

Toilet Coin Bottle

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Toilets are available at the huts along the Yoshida trail of Mount Fuji where each usage is understandably expensive at 200 yen. The higher you go, the higher the ‘donation’, and so it’s 300 yen at the summit. Some toilets have high tech vending machine like repository for coins, but a couple, or three of them use repurposed plastic bottle as receptacle for dropping in at least two 100 yen coins.

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Japan’s Tiny Toilet Bins

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Because Japan’s toilet system has powerful flush mechanism and can break down tissue papers, therefore used tissues must be flushed, and that’s the reason why their trash bins are cute. Love this hygienic system.

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In the Philippines, one needs to throw used tissue papers in the toilet trash bins because flushing it (lots of it) can cause clogging, hence the need for regular size trash bins. I really feel bad for those Japanese visitors in the country, especially the ladies who unintentionally found themselves in a situation where they’ve clogged the toilet bowl because of the mental model to flush the paper, then have realized too late the weak power of Philippine toilet flush.

EDSA John

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Makeshift pay urinal along EDSA near Malibay

People resort to inventing ‘work’ no matter how unnecessary their services may be just to survive in the city. You may see those folks calling out for passengers to ride the jeepney and they’ll receive few coins as fee from jeepney drivers. I’m sure some drivers find this unnecessary but they readily pay. They can relate, and so they recognize the effort of others trying to earn few pesos. You may also see those folks guiding drivers out from roadside parking, or those folks hailing taxis for other people hoping for tips. Some folks can be cunning where they capitalize on flash floods by providing makeshift raft for pedestrians who don’t want to walk on dirty water. Somebody also thought of capitalizing the lack of public toilets along EDSA by setting up makeshift pay urinal made from repurposed water container, and using scrap hose as drain to the sewer which has been secured to the ground by scrap wood.

No GST

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With all the fuss right now on Malaysia’s GST (Goods and Services Tax) which was implemented just last week (April 1, 2015), I find this toilet usage fee sign at the jetty for Kampung Laut in Kota Bharu quite funny.

Flushing Sink Water

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Water from the faucet with installed sink fills the tank for flushing purposes. One can then wash hands in the sink without wasting water.

Therefore I conclude that apart from those state-of-the-art toilets every visitor in Japan talks about, they also have humble but environmentally conscious ones – and of course the brand is still Toto.

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