Tag Archives: traditional

K-Broom

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The native broom of Korea

Inu-Yarai, a Singularity of Kyoto

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Whereas the curved split bamboo gutter cover (inu-yarai) design of Kyoto traditional wooden houses came to be for various purposes in the old days such as protection of the wall from dog pee, or horse dung, or rain falling on its roof, and or from eavesdroppers.

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Today, I suppose inu-yarai is used as concealment for unsightly gutter, pipes, and faucet from the street point of view – something neat and attractive yet something functional. Inu-yarai is therefore a noteworthy fragment of Kyoto’s identity.

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The Instant Jamu in Zambo

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This medicinal drink tastes like coffee says the writings in red background at the upper right corner

At the barter centers in Zamboanga City, one can most likely notice the presence of this particular jamu. Jamu is a traditional Indonesian medicinal drink, a herbal concoction of whatnot. 

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Jamu at the barter (and Duralex glassware)

From what I understand of the writings at the back of the carton, Sehat Badan treats varied ailments such as arthritis, asthma, heart disease and more. There is local demand said the Muslim lady tending the stall in the pictures, and she even ships this to a customer based in Leyte. I’ve seen plenty of jamu shops in Yogyakarta, and when I go back, I’ll document more about jamu (and Malay medicine in general). It seems fascinating.

Flying Folk Art

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In Nihonbashi, Tokyo, there is this private museum of traditional Japanese kites at the 5th floor of a building where the Taimeiken restaurant is. These are the private collections of Mr. Shingo Modegi, the former master of the Taimeiken restaurant. His successor Mr. Masaaki Modegi is presently the restaurant master and curator of the kite museum. We truly have to be thankful to these two for sharing this wonderful collection.

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Kite flying is a folk game not just in Japan, but other countries as well. Variations come in the form kite’s craftsmanship. I’ve seen the wau kite in Malaysia with its elaborate detail and moon-like form, very beautiful enough for this cultural icon to be used by Malaysian Airlines as their logo.

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One day, I really have to see for myself these kites actually flying at the festivals in Kelantan, Malaysia or in Shizuoka, Japan. For these kites aren’t just folk games, these are flying folk arts.

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