Tag Archives: Malapascua Island

Haiyan Aid Remnants

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Last August, throughout the island of Malapascua in Northern Cebu, I’ve seen plenty of Red Cross tarpaulins repurposed as house roof extension for the rebuilt homes or as boatyard shade. I even came across a Shelter Box – still standing.

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Shelter Box (Rotary)

So to those who have donated for the Shelter Box or to Red Cross for Typhoon Yolanda, I’d say those have certainly arrived as aid to the people of Malapascua as manifested from these remnants.

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Boatyard shade

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Roof extension

Note: Typhoon Yolanda first anniversary is on November 8.

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Notes on Souvenirs, Generally

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Malapascua Island attracts foreign diving tourists because of the thresher sharks, but I guess this souvenir stall profits more from local tourists

Trip souvenir acquisition is a big thing among Filipinos, generally speaking. It’s a proof of “I’ve been here“, regardless of the amount of visiting time in that statement. Outside the country, if you want to meet Filipino travelers, it is highly likely you’ll see them in keychain, t-shirt and ref magnet sort of souvenir shops.

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To have seen that man making thresher shark figurine and documenting it here is my kind of souvenir

Again, generally speaking, it’s not limited to souvenir shops where one can see some concentration of Filipino travelers, but also in popular shopping stores or districts with affordable popular items associated with the destination. Keyword is “popular”. This penchant for imported goods makes destination shopping an unwritten constant itinerary of Filipino travelers, generally.

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Varnished thresher sharks

Well Bucketball

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Well bucket from repurposed basketball ball

There is no drinking water source in Malapascua but there are several wells scattered in the island for household use.

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At the left side of the well are three funnels for each pipeline of three separate houses

One can notice these makeshift pipelines with funnels beside each well as a way to bring manually fetched water using a bucket and rope system to the nearby houses.

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Plastic strainer for this 5-gallon water container repurposed as funnel

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Net strainer

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A closer look of the well water funnel and the attached pipe

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Empty 5-gallon drinking water containers off to be refilled at mainland Cebu

Walis Tingting

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Mundane life in the island

This old lady repetitively scrape each leaflet from its rib that came from a fallen dead coconut frond, then she’d set aside each stick on the ground for her to bind all of those together to form walis tingting.

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A broom out of sticks aka walis tingting

Buriring Season

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The defense mechanism of buriring is to inflate but the container is too small for everyone to puff up

When I was in Malapascua Island at the end of July until early days of August, I came upon residents gathering buriring (pufferfish) just near the shore of the beach. This small edible species is being fished for local consumption.

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Her dinner probably

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A tub for the catch

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A closer look of buriring in its normal size

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Keeping it alive, keeping it fresh

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Buriring fishing instead of playing or schooling

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Packing-up time for mission was accomplished - dinner procurement

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A shopping bag-full of catch

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Bloated yet truly cute

Scrap Wood Boat Toys

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Boat toy made from scrap painted plywood

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Banca with katig (outrigger)

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Banca Boatyard

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This banca will take 5 days to finish and sells for 15,000 pesos

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Banca making is a livelihood here in Malapascua island

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He maintains the banca of others

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Working daily by the white sand beach. Such a beautiful workplace

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Men build bancas, women mend fishing nets

Bounty Beach

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A quiet beach where one can see solo travelers walking barefoot on the white sand. A quiet place to run too

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It's low season at this time of the year, but it doesn't mean the sun won't come up most of the time

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Mostly Europeans of varied ages are the frequent visitors of this place

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Setting foot on Malapascua Island instead of SM Aura where I've never been inside yet no matter all the hype of this and that coming to Manila, else I'll just be like the rest

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Original beauty remains despite of typhoon Yolanda's destruction of most boats and structures in this island. See that decapitated coconut tree courtesy of Miss Yolanda?

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Practically most boats are new in the island, as most boats were destroyed by typhoon Yolanda

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Sunrise in Bounty Beach, Malapascua Island

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