Tag Archives: typhoon

Haiyan Aid Remnants

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Last August, throughout the island of Malapascua in Northern Cebu, I’ve seen plenty of Red Cross tarpaulins repurposed as house roof extension for the rebuilt homes or as boatyard shade. I even came across a Shelter Box – still standing.

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Shelter Box (Rotary)

So to those who have donated for the Shelter Box or to Red Cross for Typhoon Yolanda, I’d say those have certainly arrived as aid to the people of Malapascua as manifested from these remnants.

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Boatyard shade

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Roof extension

Note: Typhoon Yolanda first anniversary is on November 8.

Bagong Pag-asa

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Almost all boats in Malapascua were destroyed by typhoon Yolanda says Mike, a German who runs a resort in the island. In the present, one can notice plenty of yellow bancas around the island. These yellow boats called Bagong Pag-asa (translated as New Hope) were donated by entities all over the world to help in the livelihood rebuilding of affected residents.

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New hope...

Bounty Beach

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A quiet beach where one can see solo travelers walking barefoot on the white sand. A quiet place to run too

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It's low season at this time of the year, but it doesn't mean the sun won't come up most of the time

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Mostly Europeans of varied ages are the frequent visitors of this place

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Setting foot on Malapascua Island instead of SM Aura where I've never been inside yet no matter all the hype of this and that coming to Manila, else I'll just be like the rest

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Original beauty remains despite of typhoon Yolanda's destruction of most boats and structures in this island. See that decapitated coconut tree courtesy of Miss Yolanda?

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Practically most boats are new in the island, as most boats were destroyed by typhoon Yolanda

Unnecessary Noise

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During my pre-college years back in Bacolod City, it seems there were more major storms then than in the last 15 years I’ve lived in Metro Manila. Back then blackouts were frequent and when hit by typhoons, blackouts will last for a month or more. A few days or even a week of that hardly affects our day to day life then. That was yesterday; today, a 12 hour blackout seems like a personal catastrophe for most. Man have created this dependency on appliances, gadgets and comforts that when deprived of, the noise from the complaints made the natural disaster look more devastating than it should be.

Yesterday afternoon in the wake of the storm, I surveyed the village where I live by running within its perimeter. There were several tree casualties, blackout like the rest of Metro Manila, but no flooding and no major debris blockage. It was very quiet in the village that I suppose residents must have fled to the malls because of electricity deprivation along with impending social media deprivation due to dying battery life of their gadgets.

Typhoon Prone

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Concrete structures were designed to withstand 200 kph wind only for example in the Pacific side but with Yolanda’s 300+ kph…

It’s about time to update the building code.

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