Tag Archives: snack

Balot Tables

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Balot tables beside the Cotta Fort in Ozamiz City

Balot snacking (spelled as balut in Manila), is a sit-down and unhurried street food indulgence in Misamis Occidental. Several small tables with chairs are available. On top of the table are the vinegar and salt condiments; under the table is a bin for egg shells and other throwaways. Indeed it’s only in Oroquieta and Ozamiz where I’ve seen an outdoor table service for balot so far.

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Spiced vinegar and salt as condiments for eating balot

It is my observation that folks from Visayas and Mindanao love balot so much and treat it as an ordinary everyday fare. I’m from Visayas and I eat balot from my elementary days until now. I cannot imagine Manila kids doing the same level of indulgence on this delightful snack. Even though Manila population consists of migrant folks from VisMin, it seems that the passing down of balot snacking to the next generation is not easy. Availability isn’t the problem, rather it’s the lack of ‘balot-eating’ ambiance in mega cities. Too bad.

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Balot tables near the plaza in Oroquieta City

Tea Egg

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This egg tastes like adobong itlog but infused with five spices. I got this from Ymart, a Taiwan specialty store somewhere in Makati. I think this will make a decent variation to my boiled egg snacking.

Maruya at Home

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One of those delightful Philippine streetfood is  the maruya, a saba fritter (plantain fritter). Roadside vendors usually sell this hot and just off from the kawali. This merienda fare is very easy to make at home that I made more than enough to share some to a neighbor.

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Three slices per saba

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Batter: flour, baking powder, milk, egg, salt, sugar, oil

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Frying in the kawali

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After few minutes of frying, drain the fritters and sprinkle with sugar. That’s it

Sweet Potato Fans

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Sweet potato from a shop in Minowa covered street in Tokyo

Japanese are fond of sweet potato. I’ve seen somebody snacking on boiled sweet potato somewhere. Seems she prepared it at home, placed in her tote as an ‘on the go’ snack.  I’ve tried the cut caramelized sugar-coated chilled ones and a sample of boiled ones from Kawagoe City in Saitama Prefecture. I even saw a shop selling sweet potato ice cream in that place.

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A store selling salted sweet potato fries in Kitain Temple Grounds at Tsuchiura City, Ibaraki Prefecture

When I was at Tsuchiura City, I’ve blissfully snacked on the salted cut ones, in other words ‘sweet potato fries’ but thicker in pieces.

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Salted sweet potato, a delicious oxymoron

And so based from I had eaten so far, I think Japan’s sweet potato variety is superior than what I’ve had (so far since childhood) in the Philippines.

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A shopkeeper in Kawagoe selling sweet potato snacks. Sweet potato is a specialty of Kawagoe, so naturally the mascot of this place is a sweet potato

Banana-cue/Banana-q

Somehow you’ll most likely come across somebody selling banana-cue whether it’s in commercial centers, offices, schools or in residential areas. This fried saba coated in caramelized sugar is such a popular snack countrywide.

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Perhaps the skewer is the reason why it's called banana-cue


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Deep frying saba and making sure that the caramelized brown sugar is well distributed

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