Tag Archives: street food

Coconut Pancakes in Banana Leaf Bowl

Vendor selling round coconut pancakes in banana leaf bowl

Stapler is the secret tool of banana leaf bowl construction

Quail Egg Snack Bowl

 For a 20 baht snack, it’s a choice between boiled or sunny side up quail eggs on a banana leaf bowl.

Hot Eats on a Hot Bench

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Hot eats on a heated bench

Hot eats on a heated bench is one example of Korean winter solution. Snacking at the bustling market despite the negative temperature outside is what makes the winter season lively instead of dreary in Seoul.

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Heated bench

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It is nice to be served hot food by the ajummas

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Balot Tables

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Balot tables beside the Cotta Fort in Ozamiz City

Balot snacking (spelled as balut in Manila), is a sit-down and unhurried street food indulgence in Misamis Occidental. Several small tables with chairs are available. On top of the table are the vinegar and salt condiments; under the table is a bin for egg shells and other throwaways. Indeed it’s only in Oroquieta and Ozamiz where I’ve seen an outdoor table service for balot so far.

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Spiced vinegar and salt as condiments for eating balot

It is my observation that folks from Visayas and Mindanao love balot so much and treat it as an ordinary everyday fare. I’m from Visayas and I eat balot from my elementary days until now. I cannot imagine Manila kids doing the same level of indulgence on this delightful snack. Even though Manila population consists of migrant folks from VisMin, it seems that the passing down of balot snacking to the next generation is not easy. Availability isn’t the problem, rather it’s the lack of ‘balot-eating’ ambiance in mega cities. Too bad.

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Balot tables near the plaza in Oroquieta City

Taiwan Sausage

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The pale looking ones are actually sticky rice inside a sausage casing. The rice sausage is being grilled, then it would be sliced lengthwise partially so the pork sausage can be wedged on it.

The pork sausage in Taipei (and around) is a savory and tempting snack whether skewered or placed inside a sticky rice sausage (that serves as bun). Quite an extraordinary sustenance because it is deliciously fatty.

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Nearly each time I could smell it, I buy. For at least five times as I can remember that I ate grilled pork sausage, I could say that I had a gratifying street food snacking experience in Taiwan. So I thought of collecting few pictures about this subject.

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Why does pork sausage taste even better at night?

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Skewered pork sausage

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For a longer satisfaction

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Of various sizes

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Pork sausage inside the sticky rice sausage. A meal in itself

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Comes in bite sizes too

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Rice Breakfast over Continental Anytime

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It was an early morning weekday rush hour where street food vendors abound. And where locals hurriedly buy either packed breakfast or packed lunch to bring to work.

From the lady with huge pot in front her; I got packed rice meal that was a cross in taste between chicken biryani and Ilonggo’s valenciana. I wished I had more breakfast mornings in Bangkok – it was that good.

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Early morning street food

Back at the hostel where travelers of different nationalities were having breakfast too in the “mess hall”, I was very delighted of my rice meal packed in brown paper than the Continental breakfast set some just ordered in there for 65 baht, which looked good by the way. But Continental breakfast is so dull and the last thing I would have. However, the-last-thing-I-would-have-for-breakfast is eternally present in almost every breakfast menus.

Kalabasa Ukoy

Fritters as street food as usual (in countless variations) like this vegetable one made from squash.

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Makeshift spider strainer and wok as necessities

Lugawan

 

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Lugawan is fairly common in every region all over the archipelago. Lugaw (rice gruel) in several variations is an appealing option for a quick meal wherever its location may be, whether in poblacion or town plaza or along highways as food stop for motorists and provincial buses.

The lugawan in this post is in Alicia town of Isabela province and one can observe several of this table lugawan setup along the national highway where each one serve boiled culled layers as an accompaniment to the plain lugaw. I remember in Bantayan island of Cebu province, grilled culled layers are sold everywhere understandably because chicken egg production is the island’s primary industry. I did enjoy snacking on that tough but tasty meat.

In that clear display shelf, one can choose chicken or egg as lugaw accompaniment or none at all but just plain lugaw depending on one’s budget.

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A lugawan place is attractive if there’s a giant caldero full of lugaw continuously heated in a stove using either charcoal or wood as fuel

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The lugaw proprietor has a penchant for green color

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Some kind of a gamu-gamo trap under a light source. Just put a bit of water inside and the gamu-gamo will go in says the lugaw guy

Tahu Sumedang

Fried soybean curd block known as tahu, Sumedang-style and accompanied by green chili pepper when eaten.

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Gorengan

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Assortment of fritters (such as tempe and tahu) for street snacking – Indonesian version.

Boat Cart

Sate already sold out for the day.
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Sate Ladies

Looks like it’s a woman’s job to peddle sate on a chosen spot sitting almost at floor level beside their tiny grill.
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Portable tiny grill that’s fit for the tiny skewered meat.
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Banana leaf as sate plate.
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More sate ladies in the street.
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Nocturnal Eats

Some Route 6 evening street food I saw during my pre-dinner run like this steamed buns in a cart

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Steamed buns

Spiced salad of tamarind, green mango and that round fruit (can’t identify in my photo). Made me think of rojak in Singapore and Malaysia.
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And this looks good, the round sausages at 1,000 riel per stick, and just off from the grill.
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Grilled Plantain Cart

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Grilled skewered plantain as street food in Siem Reap

 

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Angkor Wat Eats

Food vendors I came upon at Angkor Wat like the lady selling sandwich and steamed buns below
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A closer look of the display window
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Also a young man selling eggs, snails and grilled banana with sticky rice inside the banana leaf packaging. Most of the locals have an affinity for long sleeve shirts I notice
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Sun Baked Spiced Shells

Locals are fond of these river shells dry seasoned with salt, crushed chili pepper, etc.
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Spicy sauce in the bottle (I presume) to go with the spiced shells.
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Below, notice the varying hues for varying levels of spiciness I think. The redder the spicier.
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And here’s the Khmer lady in her chosen spot for her cart of sun baked spiced shells.
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Street Peanuts

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Peanuts, beans, etc and the small brown paper bags for packaging

Oblong Burger

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Street burger of Peninsular Malaysia. At the lower left of the sign it says 90% pure meat

Skewered Blood

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Coagulated chicken blood on stick ready for grilling. Also known as betamax.

Sayap Ayam

Grilled chicken wings as street food in Kota Kinabalu.

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Sayap ayam in night market

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