Tag Archives: palengke

Rice Stall

The number on the sign denote the price of rice per kilo in Philippine peso. Rice in open sacks on the first row are branded and their signs carry the brand name. Unbranded rice on the second and third rows have signs that tell the variety and quality factor like malambot (tender) and mabango (aromatic).

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Fish Jumping Illusion

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Why do you arrange fish like that? To which Madam Fish Vendor answered, “Para nindot tan awon, kanang murag buhi pa ba, kanang mag ambak ambak pa” (So it would be nice to look at, like they are still alive and jumping). And that’s what I thought too, that it will look fresh and still firm, though I didn’t guess the jumping part.

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Gulay Bundles

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Gulay bundles at the talipapa or palengke are tied together nowadays by rubber band. Because of that, I’ve accumulated plenty of elastics from regular gulay buying. Bundles of gulay are often priced in multiples of five starting from five pesos and most belong in this cheapest set. Examples of gulay in five peso bundle are okra, sitaw, alugbati, saluyot, kangkong, malunggay, and pechay.

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Tilapia at Talipapa

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In Manila, one can get fresh tilapia at talipapa or palengke everyday.

Bulad

Bulad (dried salted fish) of superior quality is plentiful in Zamboanga City public market. Fried bulad with warm rice as accompaniment is best eaten mano mano (hand as utensil). Moreover, think of bulad as fish bacon.

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Lapu lapu

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Dried squid and isda sa bato (that green one)

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Danggit

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Malatapay Market

Market folks gather every Wednesday to trade at Malatapay market in Zamboanguita, Negros Oriental. Reminds me of the tamu concept in Malaysia which means a gathering of market merchants on a certain day designated as market day.

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Basket is the perfect palengke bag

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Ground roasted coffee and ground roasted soybeans at 10 pesos per glass

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Tobacco stall. When it comes to market stalls, I love the bamboo ones

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My kind of vegetables

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Assortment of dry goods like baskets

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And ropes

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Near that truck is an open space for livestock auction

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Guinamos na isda (fermented fish fry). This is a very appetizing stall

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The biggest guinamos I've seen

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If I have to choose only one among three plates of appetizers from the sea namely, guso, lato or lukot, I'd choose lukot

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Lukot salad. Mouthwatering

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Bibingka and salvaro?

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Hot meals and dine in tables are available

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Tinolang isda for my meal

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A quarter kilo of lechon for my meal too

Arinola Cashbox

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Red arinola hanging in this fruit stall at downtown Iloilo

For the palengke or roadside vendors it seems that the portable potty (arinola) is the most efficient receptacle for cash. I’ve seen this type of cashbox-arinola phenomenon all over the country.

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Arinola is the green one behind the bottles. Seen at a talipapa in Metro Manila

Palengke Style Longganisa

In Cabatuan public market, I came across two guys preparing longganisa (sausage) palengke style.

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Cleaning the pork intestines by means of scraping

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Casing of the longganisa from cleaned pork intestines. All natural

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Adding lots of sugar and some salt into the 5 kilo ground pork

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This is the most unappealing part - the addition of strawberry food color

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Soy sauce is added

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Mixing by hand

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The mix is now ready to be made into links using the natural casing from pig intestines

Local Market in Jogja

While shopping arcades/malls will draw the life out of me, local markets give the opposite effect. In a larger picture, Southeast Asian local markets look and feel the same though it’s just a generality. There are detailed contrasts between regions from the atmosphere, to the quantity of certain ingredients also the variety, the tools, the merchants and patrons, the layout, the arrangement, and even the ornamentation.

I went to this food market in Yogyakarta near Prawirotaman street and took joy (as usual) in my stroll within.
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Floor level seating is the norm.
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I’ve noticed that there’s no market type of shouting, a contrast to the palengkera manner of calling out to shoppers (in a good way) in the Philippines where that kind of market chaos (one that I love) is eternally present. These merchants were relatively quiet in Jogja.
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See the mangoes in that handsome timbangan (weighing scale). Also chilies, petai and sprouts in those flat round baskets.
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The chicken lady of the market and her timbangan. I like this photo.
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Spice pack of galangal, bay leaves and lemongrass. So unlike in the Philippines where one can see Knorr Cubes and Magic Sarap junk in the palengke.
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Those are palm sugar inside the clear plastic bags.
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The Indonesian cook who was with me the second time I went here says these are macadamia nuts commonly used in Indonesian cooking (but I think she meant candlenuts).
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Dry Goods

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Usually, I’m drawn to the dry goods section in a palengke particularly the native stuff. Though some of the old school containers and implements can still be found in some  supermarkets, yet I’d rather buy from these palengke folks.
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Ube

I enjoy seeing rootcrops in the palengke such as this purple yam.
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Abo Dried Fish

I grew up eating fried fresh abo in Bacolod but in Camarines Sur salted dried abo is quite common.

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Abo tuyo at 140 pesos a kilo

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One of the many tuyo tables in Sipocot palengke

Kadios Season

You know you’re an Ilonggo if you eat this bean.

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Removing kadios beans from its pod

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Ready to measure a glass of it worth Php25

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Filling the glass

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Pay for 2 glassful of kadios then go home and cook KBL

Animal Feeds by the Kilo

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Poultry feed

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Assortment of feeds for livestock, gamefowl, and pets

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For gamefowl and pets

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For swine

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For chickens

Palengke

A public market has more character than a supermarket. It’s so vibrant and colorful. It’s where you can observe local trade, find and sample local stuff and learn. It’s entertaining. It’s the type of chaos that I love.

Tayabas Market

See that seller, when you buy from her, you help her directly instead of helping big corporations (e.g.  SM Supermarket)

See that seller, when you buy from her, you help her directly instead of helping big corporations (e.g. SM Supermarket)

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